16th January 2016

Snowy Loweswater Fells

Details
Time 09:05am to 2:15pm
Duration 5 hr 10 min
Distance 8.6 mile
Ascent 2300 ft
Walking with Rod Hepplewhite
Route
Fangs Brow - Burnbank Fell - Carling Knott - Blake Fell - Fothergill Head - Gavel Fell - Above Black Crag - High Look Farm - Watergate Farm - Loweswater - Hudson Place - Jenkinson Place - Iredale Place - Fangs Brow
 
Fells visited
 
 
 
Directory places visited
 

Starting Point Information Centre -
Roadside parking at the top of Fangs Brow, Loweswater

This is another of the many roadside areas in the Lake District which have been adopted as a permanent, yet unofficial car park. At a push you might get ten small cars along here and although I rarely see no cars at all here, I can usually manage to find a space.

A gate in the wall next to the parking spaces leads directly onto the track which runs all the way to High Nook Tarn, taking in views of Loweswater and the north western fells along the way.


Weather Readings
                 

       
The Gadget
All readings were taken using a Kestrel 2000 Weather Meter
Temperature
Live temperature recorded at the time I press the hold key
Maximum Wind Speed Maximum wind speed since the weather meter was turned on at each location Average Wind Speed
Average wind speed since the weather meter was turned on at each location
Wind Chill
Combination of wind speed and temperature. The gadget does the calculations not me.
                 
 

Route Map



Photos

We're walking on the Loweswater fells today and after the forecasters telling us the snow would arrive sometime later in the afternoon we thought we'd have finished the walk and be back home long before it turned up. It didn't quite work out that way but our timing turned out to be spot on and the walk itself was thoroughly enjoyable from start to finish, , , , , except the bit when I went through some ice and got soaked from my thigh to my feet. Had it been a really windy, freezing cold day I suspect I'd have turned back at that point, but it wasn't so I didn't.
 

From the viewpoint on the shoulder of Burnbank Fell we look down to Loweswater, Darling Fell, Low Fell and across to Whiteside.
 

As we headed up to Burnbank Fell summit enjoying the sunshine, we couldn't help notice the blackness out towards the coast.
 

Burnbank Fell summit
 

Straight ahead of us is Blake Fell and, just to the left of the picture is Carling Knott where we're heading first. We follow the fence for a good way before walking cross-country to Carling Knott.
 

Looking back towards Burnbank Fell.
 

 
 

We walk across Carling Knott but rather than making straight for the top, we continue to the lower end of the ridge as far as the viewpoint. There's a little bit of height loss which needs to be regained but it's well worth the effort.
Just to the right of the ridge we're on is Grasmoor.
 

And for our efforts, we're treated to this view.
 

Here's a fog bow.
 

On the return journey we pass by the summit shelter. Ahead of us is Blake Fell and some knee deep snow which makes an ordinarily easy walk into hard work.
 

Looking back to Carling Knott
 

The view from Blake Fell.
 

Looking back to Blake Fell.
 

Gavel Fell summit. From here we could see it was snowing over Ennerdale and towards the coast and it was heading our way, , , , quickly.
Well, apart from the uphill bits it's all down hill from here.
 

No camera or computer tricks here folks, the sky really was that colour.
 

As we lost height walking over Black Crag the snow caught up with us and by the time we reached this point the fells we'd just walked over were all hidden in the cloud and snow. More than once we said that our timing had been perfect; albeit not planned that way.
 

Snow / sleet or not, stomachs needed filled so we made for the seat outside the bothy.
 

Loweswater bothy looked like it has residents at the moment.
 

Before we walk up to Hudson Place I take this picture looking down Loweswater.
 

 
 

Iredale Place in front of Darling Fell.
 

What a great walk. Distance-wise it might not have been particulary long but enjoyment-wise it was very high indeed.
 



David Hall -
Lake District Walks