21st November 2015

Longlands Fell to Binsey

Details
Time 8:10am to 1:15pm
Duration 5 hr 5 min
Distance 9.7 mile
Ascent 2700 ft
Walking with Paul Sharkey
Route
Longlands - Lodness - Longlands Fell - Brae Fell - Little Sca Fell - Great Sca Fell - Meal Fell - Trusmadoor - Great Cockup - Orthwaite Bank - Orthwaite - Black Wood - Overwater Hall - Whitefield Cottage - Binsey
 
Fells visited
 
 
 
 
 
Directory places visited
 

Starting Point Information Centre -
Roadside parking, Longlands

With some degree of sensible parking you could probably get ten cars parked here. Once these are gone then I'm afraid it's a case of going elswhere. The roads around here simply aren't wide enough to accommodate roadside parking.

Parking is free.

 

Weather Readings
                 

       
The Gadget
All readings were taken using a Kestrel 2000 Weather Meter
Temperature
Live temperature recorded at the time I press the hold key
Maximum Wind Speed Maximum wind speed since the weather meter was turned on at each location Average Wind Speed
Average wind speed since the weather meter was turned on at each location
Wind Chill
Combination of wind speed and temperature. The gadget does the calculations not me.
                 
 

Route Map



Photos

Rubbish weather, work, and other stuff have kept me off the fells over the last few weeks so it was really good to finally get back out into the great outdoors again. With the blue sky, sunshine, the first snow of the winter and an area I have a particular fondness for, I couldn't have asked for a better walk to get back into the swing of things.
As this was a linear walk, we'd left Paul's car at the bottom of Binsey and driven the short distance to Longlands in mine to begin walking. Here, after a nights frost and a dusting of snow, you see one of the houses found at Longlands. A chilly looking place deprived of any early sunshine because of the shadow of Longlands Fell.
 

Longlands Fell is reached in bright sunshine, and with crystal clear views across to the higher northern fells it felt like the previous two weekends of atrocious weather were now forgotten.
 

Summit time was brief but before leaving I turn around to take this picture looking over the Cumbrian coastal area to the Solway, and then Scotland beyond that.
 

Looking back across to Longlands Fell. (the one on the right)
 

The next of our fells today was Brae Fell. Here at the top, I record a windchill temperature of almost minus thirteen. Despite this we hang around for a while taking it all in. Notice the frost on the fields down there.
 

 
 

The temperature was so low today Paul had to crouch down to read the bottom of the thermometer. While he was that close to the ground he decided to take a picture.
 

From Brae Fell we head steadily up hill with the sunshine dazzling the view ahead and soft fluffy snow under out feet. Absolutely magical.
 

As we stand at the top of Little Sca Fell and admire the snow covered Skiddaw fells, I can't help but think that someone must have really, really wanted a cairn up here. Why else would they go to all the trouble of digging all the stones out of the ground. I can't see that the stones came from anywhere else so they must have came out of the hole (before it actually was a hole).
 

A little further up the fell and we reach Great Sca Fell. Here you see High Pike and Carrock Fell in the distance.
 

Knott, seen from Great Sca Fell.
 

From Great Sca Fell we head down (then slightly up) to Meal Fell. As we said at the time, progress is quick in this area because the walking is generally quite easy going. That's not to say it's any less enjoyable though.
 

Looking back to Little Sca Fell and Great Sca Fell.
 

Here's another view looking back. This time from Great Cockup.
 

Great Cockup offers this view of Dead Crags, Bakestall, Skiddaw and Skiddaw Little Man.
 

Although there are still lots of interesting places along the way, our sights are now set on Binsey. So, it's downhill we go, across the valley and eventually onto the path you can clearly see running up the fell over there.
 

Here's a picture of the two of us surveying our route ahead. Overwater is in the centre, Binsey is over there on the left, and on the right of the picture is Chapelhouse reservoir.
It must be warming up a bit down there because the fields aren't quite as white as they were first thing this morning.
 

 
 

 
 

Below us is the tiny hamlet of Orthwaite which is so small it only has a couple of farms and a couple of houses. I really wish I'd paid more attention to what I was told when I was a kid because I have strong family connections to Orthet (as it's pronounced). I actually have connections to the whole area; some of which I know in great detail but all I remember of this place is that my mother lived here during WW2 helping her uncle out on his farm.
 

Just after passing the house on the right hand side of the road we turn left to walk across the fields which would take us to Overwater Hall.
 

After the amount of rain in recent weeks the frozen ground made life much easier for our walk across the lower lying farmland between Orthwaite and Overwater Hall.
 

I've no idea who this fella was but he's certainly a bit creepy, despite having an almost comical expression on his face.
 

 
 

Now we pass through the grounds of Overwater Hall which is ran as a very upmarket hotel these days. I suspect if we'd walked through here 100 years ago one of the servants would have been told to "get out there and remove the riffraff".
 

 
 

After a short walk along the road, we pass by Paul's car, walk through the gate and then begin the walk up Binsey.
 

From here we look back and note that we can see almost all of our route. Great Sca Fell looks a heck of a long way from here but, as this walk shows, it's not actually that difficult to include them both in the same route.
 

As the top of Binsey is reached we agree this would be as good a spot as any for something to eat.
 

For a place that many people view as nothing more than somewhere they 'need' to walk up but don't really want to, Binsey offers some fantastic views and, as we've shown today, you don't always have to park at the bottom and walk straight up and down.
 

And to finish, I have a close up of Overwater and the fells we were on at the beginning of the walk.
Hopefully Paul still wants to give me a lift back to Longlands to pick up my car !!
 



David Hall -
Lake District Walks