7th April 2012

Tewet Tarn and High Rigg

 

Walk Overview
Details
Time 11.15 to 13.45
Duration 2 hr 30 min
Distance 6.1 mile
Ascent 1200 ft
Walking with On my own
Route
Castlerigg Stone Circle - Goosewell Fsrm - Naddle Bridge - Tewet Tarn - St John's in the Vale Church - High Rigg - Shaw Bank - Dale Bottom - Nest Brow - Castle Lane - Castlerigg Stone Circle
 
Fells visited
Directory places visited
 
 

Starting Point Information Centre
Parking spaces, Castlerigg Stone Circle

If you arrive here in the middle of the day at the height of summer, you'll probably find the place full, but if you're prepared to wait, it won't be long until one of the visitors at Castlerigg Stone Circle jumps in their car and drives off. Unless you're using this place as a starting poit for a walk, most people only seem to stay here for ten or fifteen minutes at the most.

Surprisingly because it's next to such a popular tourist attraction parking is free.

 


Route Map
 
 
Photos

This wasn't the walk I'd originally planned to do today. Then again it is a bank holiday weekend and the forecast was predictably uncertain. On reflection, I could have walked further and higher than I did, but it didn't work out that way so here I am looking across to Lonscale Fell and Blease Fell from the parking spaces next to Castlerigg Stone Circle.

Just about opposite Goosewell Farm you get this view down to High Rigg and Dale Bottom.

Permissive Path, , , across the field to Naddle Bridge.

Through the gate and a looking up to Walla Crag (the pointed bit in the middle of the picture).

and the same view seen from Naddle Bridge.

Blencathra topped with cloud, as were most of the higher fells when I set off today.

Lonscale Fell and Skiddaw Little Man reflected in Tewet Tarn.

After walking past the tarn it's hard not to take a picture looking across to Blencathra.
Lonscale Fell and Great Calva are also in the picture. Lonscale on the left and Great Calve just visible at the back of the photo.

Low Rigg residents.
That's the Old Coach Road over there on the left. Had it been a nice sunny day I was going to walk over there on one of the passes walks. As it turned out, 19 mile is too far to walk with such an uncertain forecast.

and another one.

Heading down to St john's in the Vale Church.

The sound must have been travelling well today. I could hear every word of the instructions the guy at the bottom was giving. He made it sound so easy and the boy on the rope made it look easy. Regardless of that; I didn't hang around just in case they asked me to have a go.

I don't have a yellow streak down my back for nothing you know !


 

St John's in the Vale Church.

Half way up High Rigg I took this photo looking across to Threlkeld and Blencathra.

High Rigg summit, in front of Clough Head.

That's the way I'm going, down to the wall you see in the centre of the picture.

A close up of Fornside.

 
A view down the route I took from the ridge down to the Shaw Bank road   and and view back up.

Naddle Valley / Dale Bottom. In the distance you can see Dodd, Carl Side and Skiddaw.

Looking in more or less the same direction as the previous picture. This time with not so much of Dodd, but with Lonscale Fell in the photo.

Stone Cottage.

A sort of close up of White Side, Helvellyn and Helvellyn Lower Man.

Another picture of Blencathra. This one taken from the fields across Dale Bottom.

The Dodds and Helvellyn.

Low Nest Farm in front of Blencathra.

Looking across from Castle Lane you get a view of the eastern fells from Clough Head to Helvellyn. And of course High Rigg running across the centre of the picture.

Castle Lane.

Castlerigg Stone Circle.

Stones in front of Clough Head and Great Dodd.

When I got back onto the road a bloke asked me if I know where the stone circle was. I pointed through the gate and told him 'That's it up there. You can see the stones from here"
"are you sure" he said, "according to the GPS it's further down the road"
"I'm positive, , , you can see them from here, and all the people"
"that must be something else, here, have a look at the GPS"
"No you're OK. I must have been here a hundred times over the years so I don't need a GPS to tell me where I am"
"Thanks for your help anyway but I'll just carry on down the road"

Considering he totally ignored what I said, he still seemed very grateful. I'm not sure how far he walked, although I suspect he's somewhere in the Penrith area by now.




David Hall -
Lake District Walks